Welcome

  • Raising hope for conservation – how can crowdfunding finance biodiversity protection?

    Crowdfunding is becoming an increasingly popular source of support for biodiversity conservation. A recent study reveals an expansive global crowdfunding network for conservation that brings much-needed support for research and species-focused projects. Researchers explored how this new fundraising mechanism might impact conservation, both financially and beyond.

    Andy Lee

    December 27, 2018
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    Ecotourism is good for cheetahs? Not so fast.

    Ecotourism in Kenya is celebrated as a win-win solution that benefits both cheetahs and humans. Tourists get to see cheetahs in their natural habitat while funding wildlife preserves. But what happens to cheetah cubs when they are surrounded by overeager visitors? A new study examines how ecotourism affects cheetah cubs’ chance at survival. 

    Amy Zuckerwise

    December 21, 2018
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    We must address local threats to coral reefs

    Coral reefs are fragile ecosystems that support an abundance of marine life. Climate change and human activities threaten the existence of these reefs. In Maui, scientists found that treated wastewater seeps into coral reefs and causes coral degradation at an alarmingly high rate. 

    Rebecca Lehman

    December 18, 2018
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    How to combat electronic waste trafficking? The path may be tracking.

    E-waste is frequently exported to developing countries and are recycled manually, polluting the air, soil and water and affecting workers and vulnerable communities. The Basel Convention is an international treaty created to counter that. However, enforcement and monitoring is lacking. Researchers and the Basel Action Network took matters into their own hands.

    Anna Maria Cárcamo

    December 6, 2018
The insufficiency of mediations on land rights conflicts in the Global South: Lessons from Indonesia

Land rights conflicts are a well-known problem in the expansion of industrial plantations in the Global South. To resolve conflicts, the disputing groups tend to choose mediation instead of an inefficient formal court system. Despite the advantages of mediation, findings from Indonesia show that mediation is incomplete without addressing wider injustices in land rights issues.

Brurce Mecca
January 3, 2019
GRACEfully Managing Groundwater from Outer Space

Groundwater managers have a difficult time getting a sense of how much water farmers and urban water users extract from aquifers. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) is a satellite technology that uses microwaves to generate data that researchers use to build Earth gravity models. The models produced from GRACE data help water managers know how much water farmers and urban water planners have withdrawn from the ground. This helps communities manage their groundwater resources sustainably.

Phillip Dube
January 1, 2019
Raising hope for conservation – how can crowdfunding finance biodiversity protection?

Crowdfunding is becoming an increasingly popular source of support for biodiversity conservation. A recent study reveals an expansive global crowdfunding network for conservation that brings much-needed support for research and species-focused projects. Researchers explored how this new fundraising mechanism might impact conservation, both financially and beyond.

Andy Lee
December 27, 2018
Ecotourism is good for cheetahs? Not so fast.

Ecotourism in Kenya is celebrated as a win-win solution that benefits both cheetahs and humans. Tourists get to see cheetahs in their natural habitat while funding wildlife preserves. But what happens to cheetah cubs when they are surrounded by overeager visitors? A new study examines how ecotourism affects cheetah cubs’ chance at survival. 

Amy Zuckerwise
December 21, 2018

Articles

Features

YER First Editor's Choice Competition

The staff at Yale Environment Review would like to announce the winner and finalists for the first-ever
Editor’s Choice Competition.

Eleven articles, all written by past or present YER authors who are still at FES, were judged by the YER team of writers. From that eleven, three finalists were selected. The final decision was made by the editorial board at the end of the fall semester.