Welcome

  •  
    Wakes in the waves – why do dolphins and whales attend to their dead?

    Similar to humans and other intelligent animals, dolphins and whales sometimes show interest in and attend to their dead. Recent research suggests that such behavior is common in species with larger brains, and may have been evolved to assist the survival of their kin. The animals might understand death, and be affected emotionally by it.

    Andy Lee

    May 30, 2019
  • Cows, crops and climate change: China’s meat producing industry needs to change

    Meat consumption in China is on the rise. This trend carries significant environmental implications. Despite environmental concerns, Chinese consumers continue to seek out meat. To keep the increase in meat demand from threatening global sustainability, the country will need to manage its livestock feed sourcing and manure in creative new ways.

    Kylee Chang

    May 28, 2019
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    Cutting down the amphibian tree of life: how humans are changing amphibian habitats

    Humans are changing the environment in ways that are causing extreme loss of amphibian species. Amphibians thrive in forests, but when those forests are cut down, amphibians can disappear on a massive scale. New research also shows that when forests change, amphibians that are unique on an evolutionary level are more likely to become locally extinct. Losing these distinct amphibian species could have devastating effects on future forest ecosystems.

    Emma Johnson

    May 23, 2019
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    How to Engage People In Climate Change Negotiations? With Role Playing Games

    Despite scientific evidence on the catastrophic impacts of climate change, public opinion is still not strong enough to force the bold policy actions necessary to counter it. A new role-playing game, “World Climate”, could be more effective than traditional science communication strategies and help encourage more people—and policymakers—to act on climate change.

    Anna Maria Cárcamo

    May 21, 2019
Wakes in the waves – why do dolphins and whales attend to their dead?

Similar to humans and other intelligent animals, dolphins and whales sometimes show interest in and attend to their dead. Recent research suggests that such behavior is common in species with larger brains, and may have been evolved to assist the survival of their kin. The animals might understand death, and be affected emotionally by it.

Andy Lee
May 30, 2019
Cows, crops and climate change: China’s meat producing industry needs to change

Meat consumption in China is on the rise. This trend carries significant environmental implications. Despite environmental concerns, Chinese consumers continue to seek out meat. To keep the increase in meat demand from threatening global sustainability, the country will need to manage its livestock feed sourcing and manure in creative new ways.

Kylee Chang
May 28, 2019
Cutting down the amphibian tree of life: how humans are changing amphibian habitats

Humans are changing the environment in ways that are causing extreme loss of amphibian species. Amphibians thrive in forests, but when those forests are cut down, amphibians can disappear on a massive scale. New research also shows that when forests change, amphibians that are unique on an evolutionary level are more likely to become locally extinct. Losing these distinct amphibian species could have devastating effects on future forest ecosystems.

Emma Johnson
May 23, 2019
How to Engage People In Climate Change Negotiations? With Role Playing Games

Despite scientific evidence on the catastrophic impacts of climate change, public opinion is still not strong enough to force the bold policy actions necessary to counter it. A new role-playing game, “World Climate”, could be more effective than traditional science communication strategies and help encourage more people—and policymakers—to act on climate change.

Anna Maria Cárcamo
May 21, 2019

Articles

Features

YER First Editor's Choice Competition

The staff at Yale Environment Review would like to announce the winner and finalists for the first-ever
Editor’s Choice Competition.

Eleven articles, all written by past or present YER authors who are still at FES, were judged by the YER team of writers. From that eleven, three finalists were selected. The final decision was made by the editorial board at the end of the fall semester.