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  •  
    Bright lights, big city: why light pollution threatens migratory birds

    Migratory birds rely on high quality habitat in which to rest overnight during their annual journeys.  However, a recent study suggests that city lights can divert birds from their traditional flight paths.  By resting in areas with fewer resources – be it less cover for protection or fewer plants and insects to eat – birds may need more time to complete their migrations and arrive at their destinations in poorer condition.     

    Erica Engstrom

    October 31, 2018
  •  
    Water, water nowhere

    By 2050 two thirds of the world’s population will live in urban areas. This growth will cause an 80% increase in city water demand. To fulfill this growing need for water in cities, water will be taken away from rural and agricultural needs.

    Rebecca Lehman

    October 25, 2018
  • Can livestock grazing coexist with plant diversity in Australian rangelands?

    Across the globe, rangelands are rapidly changing due to human-caused disturbances. New research shows that in Australia, livestock grazing is shifting the balance of plant diversity in favor of non-native species. This could pose serious conservation challenges for Australian rangelands in years to come.

    Lexi Smith

    October 16, 2018
  •  
    Have your sustainable beef (and eat it too)

    In the United States alone, beef production accounts for twenty percent of greenhouse gas emissions and it is the least efficient source of protein production. Americans will continue to eat beef; so designing a sustainable industry is essential to reducing emissions. In a new study, scientists explore two straightforward ways to achieve a sustainable industry – all without sacrificing your cheeseburgers.

    Nathalie Sommer

    October 16, 2018
Bright lights, big city: why light pollution threatens migratory birds

Migratory birds rely on high quality habitat in which to rest overnight during their annual journeys.  However, a recent study suggests that city lights can divert birds from their traditional flight paths.  By resting in areas with fewer resources – be it less cover for protection or fewer plants and insects to eat – birds may need more time to complete their migrations and arrive at their destinations in poorer condition.       

Erica Engstrom
October 31, 2018
Water, water nowhere

By 2050 two thirds of the world’s population will live in urban areas. This growth will cause an 80% increase in city water demand. To fulfill this growing need for water in cities, water will be taken away from rural and agricultural needs.  

Rebecca Lehman
October 25, 2018
Have your sustainable beef (and eat it too)

In the United States alone, beef production accounts for twenty percent of greenhouse gas emissions and it is the least efficient source of protein production. Americans will continue to eat beef; so designing a sustainable industry is essential to reducing emissions. In a new study, scientists explore two straightforward ways to achieve a sustainable industry – all without sacrificing your cheeseburgers.

Nathalie Sommer
October 16, 2018
Can livestock grazing coexist with plant diversity in Australian rangelands?

Across the globe, rangelands are rapidly changing due to human-caused disturbances. New research shows that in Australia, livestock grazing is shifting the balance of plant diversity in favor of non-native species. This could pose serious conservation challenges for Australian rangelands in years to come.  

Lexi Smith
October 16, 2018

Articles

Features

YER First Editor's Choice Competition

The staff at Yale Environment Review would like to announce the winner and finalists for the first-ever
Editor’s Choice Competition.

Eleven articles, all written by past or present YER authors who are still at FES, were judged by the YER team of writers. From that eleven, three finalists were selected. The final decision was made by the editorial board at the end of the fall semester.